Long Term Control Plan Affected Roads To Be Milled, Repaved After Construction Ends

06/12/2018

 LTCP

Noblesville Utilities is nearing the end of Long Term Control Plan Phase IV work to make upgrades to northern Old Town storm sewer systems. Currently, storm pipe is being installed on Clinton Street and brick installation has started on Logan Street.

Phase IV construction began in August 2017. The main purpose of this project is to separate the combination sewers so stormwater is sent to the receiving stream of White River and the sanitary sewer to the Wastewater Treatment Plant.

“Prior to this project, stormwater and sewage both ran to the treatment plant, which causes additional workload to the plant – especially in times of flooding or high rainfall. The project will improve drainage during heavy downpours as well,” Noblesville Utilities Director Ray Thompson said.

When phase IV work was stopped in the winter, all roads that had been disturbed were temporarily filled with either asphalt or stone. Construction resumed in April on the installation of three storm sewers on 12th Street running east at Clinton, Logan and Conner streets and another storm sewer between Monument and Grant streets down 12th Street. Restoral of sidewalks and work on the rain gardens at 10th and Wayne streets will be completed within a few weeks.

In May, Noblesville announced its annual street rehabilitation project to address the most necessary infrastructure needs within the city. The city has budgeted $2.6 million to address road and alley repaving and repair work to sidewalks and ramps. That project did not include any roads within the LTCP project’s scope. All roads affected from the sewer system project that have not been permanently repaired will be milled and repaved at the same time this summer. Thompson said milling will begin on June 18 – after all underground work is completed – and weather permitting, repaving will start June 25 and be completed in July.

“We appreciate the understanding and patience that residents living nearby have had throughout this project,” said Thompson. “In addition to a better storm sewer system, the affected roads will be improved as well. Our plan is to pave more roadway than was in the original project scope.”

Due to the number of streets work is being done on, the project was expected to be completed by October but is ahead of schedule.